Canadian Advanced Senior High
                    BSID 882214
info@cahigh.ca
1-647-728-1622


SCHOOL COURSE CALENDAR 2018-2019

Overview

Canadian Advanced Senior High (CA High) offers Ontario credit courses to students who wish to achieve academic standing that will lead towards completing their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) and preparing for admission to college and university. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma is an essential requirement by the Ministry of Education for every student to achieve or attend secondary school until the age of 18 years. Canadian Advanced Senior High is committed to ensure every student receives a quality secondary school experience that prepares them for the next steps of learning whether it is to pursue post-secondary education or the workplace.

Canadian Advanced Senior High believes in accountability, equity, community and global partnerships. A graduate of Canadian Advanced Senior High will be the 21st century global citizen who is multilingual, travelled, life-long and self-directed learner, articulate communicator, collaborative worker, complex thinker, community contributor, and quality producer.


School Organization

Canadian Advanced Senior High (CA High) offers continuous intake online courses throughout the year. Each course comprises of a minimum of 110 hours of instruction, use of technology, assessments and evaluation, independent student learning. Mid-term and final evaluations are essential requirements as well as assessment in their course work, student assignments, projects, and presentations. Mid-term and final reports are issued to the student for each course.

Code of Conduct

Canadian Advanced Senior High advocates a safe, nurturing, respectful, and positive learning environment that supports students to succeed to their full potential. While attending Canadian Advanced Senior High, the student shows respect to each other and to the school staff.

Students have the responsibility to:

* Be prepared to learn and log in regularly

* Respect the rights of others to learn

* Respond respectfully and comply with staff instruction and direction

* Apply the Code of Conduct and the Acceptable Use Policy of the Internet expectations

Prohibited conduct includes:

* Bullying or intimidation (including bullying)

* Disruptive in courses

* Persistent absences

* Disrespecting other students and school staff

A. Attendance

The Ministry of Education requires that 110 hours should be successfully completed to earn an Ontario credit. Students should complete the weekly assignments and participate in forums/ discussions on a timely basis. Students are required to log in at least once per week on course activity. Students are expected to spend approximately 7 hours per week for both online and offline learning activities.

Students are required to keep a Student Learning Log for each course documenting online and offline activities.

Teacher will provide a timeline and schedule for student participation and assignment submission is established upon registration (continuous intake) based on a 110-hour course. Teacher support is available during the course. Teacher tracks student activity through the learning platform on a daily basis.

The course teachers will attempt to contact the student and will report to the school if the following situations occur:

1. Students failed to login in 2 consecutive weeks will be counted as one absence;

2. By mid-term, if students failed to complete 40% of course work;

The principal/ designate will contact the parent/ guardian/ student over age 18 to determine if there are unknown or additional circumstances to consider or whether the student should withdraw from the course.

When a student has 3 or more absences, the school will issue a warning letter and will advise the student to withdraw from the course if situation persists. The

objective of these procedures is to encourage students to re-engage and complete the course successfully.

B. School Safety

All students and school staff must not:

* Commit an act of vandalism that causes damage to school property

* Engage in any form of bullying or harassment

* Engage in hate propaganda or other types of hate or bias behaviour

C. Academic Honesty

Students must demonstrate academic honesty for all assignments, presentations, tests, and examinations. Plagiarism is the act of stealing someone else’s words, ideas, or images without acknowledging or giving credit to that individual’s work. Plagiarism is cheating.

Examples of Plagiarism:

* Copying facts and information from another source such as from a website or from Wikipedia

* Copying or purchasing an article or essay from another person

* Having another person impersonate you to write your course assignments or final exam

Consequences:

The following actions will be taken to deal with plagiarism depending on the severity and frequency of the incident at the discretion of the principal:

* The teacher will interview the student and report the incident to the principal. Parents or guardians will be contacted.

* Students who plagiarize can expect facing progressive consequences including a warning, a zero on the assignment, course suspension, course dismissal or permanent dismissal from the school.

D. Computer/Internet Use

a) Acceptable Use Policy

Canadian Advanced Senior High provides information technology resources for use by students and staff to support its teaching and learning. The use of these resources must be consistent with the goals of the school. Students are expected to act responsibly and to follow the school’s guidelines, policies, and procedures in using information technology and electronic networks accessed by such technology.

The acceptable use policy defines the way in which a user may behave in the Canadian Advanced Senior High learning management system. Users should be respectful to each other, not act in ways that are unethical or illegal and be aware that all actions are logged and monitored. Canadian Advanced Senior High learning management system is intended for educational purposes. Students who violate the use of the learning management system will have their registration and access withdrawn. Disciplinary action may include criminal investigation and legal sanctions.

Online security:

o Do not share your username or password with anyone.

o Do not log in anonymously or as another user.

Information restriction:

Do not upload, display, distribute or publish any information that:

o is illegal or that advocates illegal acts or facilitates unlawful activity;

o threatens or intimidates any person or suggests violence, hatred or discrimination toward other people;

o uses inappropriate or abusive language or conduct;

o is racially, culturally or religiously offensive;

o is of a defamatory, obscene, pornographic or sexually explicit nature;

o contains personal information, images, or signatures of individuals without their prior informed consent.

b) Hardware and software requirements

* Any computer with headset and microphone

* High speed internet connection

* Windows 7 or higher or MAC OS X 10.6 or higher

* Java/ JRE

* Adobe Flash Player

* Quicktime

* Microsoft Office

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

The Ontario Secondary School Diploma is granted when a student has met the rigour and high expectations of the Ministry of Education credit requirements that follow the curriculum guidelines and the Growing Success Policy of assessment, evaluation, and reporting in Ontario Schools. A student must complete a minimum of 30 credits (18 compulsory credits and 12 optional credits), 40 hours of community involvement activities, and the provincial literacy requirement.

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion (that is, completion with a final percentage mark of 50 per cent or higher) of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. Credits are granted by a principal on behalf of the Minister of Education for courses that have been developed or authorized by the ministry. A half-credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry developed course in accordance with the policy outlined in the curriculum policy documents. Most courses are offered as single-credit courses. Some courses, such as technological education, interdisciplinary studies, and cooperative education courses, may be offered as multiple-credit courses.

For the purpose of granting a credit, scheduled time is defined as the time during which students participate in planned learning activities designed to lead to the achievement of the curriculum expectations of a course. Planned learning activities include interaction between the teacher and the student and assigned individual or group work (other than homework) related to the achievement of the learning expectations in the course. Planned learning activities will be delivered through online instructions.

From The Ontario Schools K to 12 document (2016)

A) 18 compulsory credits of

• 4 credits in English (1 credit per grade)

• 3 credits in mathematics (1 credit in grade 11 or 12)

• 2 credits in science

• 1 credit in Canadian history

• 1 credit in Canadian geography

• 1 credit in the arts

• 1 credit in health and physical education

• 1 credit in French as a second language

• 0.5 credit in career studies

• 0.5 credit in civics

Plus one credit from each of the following groups:

• Group 1: additional credit in English, or French as a second language, or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities, or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education

• Group 2: additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a second language, or cooperative education

• Group 3: additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12), or technological education, or French as a second language, or computer studies, or cooperative education

B) In addition to the compulsory credits, students must complete:

• 12 optional credits

• 40 hours of community involvement activities

• the provincial literacy requirement

A maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD) may be counted towards the 4 compulsory credits in English, but the fourth must be a credit earned for a Grade 12 compulsory English course.

In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from group1 and one from either group2 or group 3. (Details of each group are available on the Ministry of Education website or discuss with guidance counsellor.)

A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits. The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses.

Ontario Ministry of Education, 2011

Certificates of Education

A. The Ontario Secondary School Certificate

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) will be granted to students who may be leaving school before completing the OSSD. A student who requests an OSSC must have a minimum of 14 credits.

7 compulsory credits:

2 credits in English

1 credit in Canadian Geography or Canadian History

1 credit in Mathematics

1 credit in Science

1 credit in Health & Physical Education

1 credit in The Arts/ Technological Education/ Computer Studies

7 optional credits:

7 credits selected by the student from other available courses.

B. Certificate of Accomplishment

This certificate is to acknowledge the achievement of students who plan to pursue a vocational program or other type of training or employment that have not fulfilled the requirements of the OSSC or OSSD.

The Secondary School Literacy Graduation Requirement

All students are required to meet the secondary school literacy graduation requirement in order to earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). The requirement is based on the expectations for reading and writing throughout the Ontario curriculum up to and including Grade 9. The purpose of the secondary school literacy graduation requirement is to determine whether students have the skills in reading and writing that they will need to succeed in school, at work, and in daily life.

To meet this requirement, students are expected to take and successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) in Grade 10 in accordance with the policies. Once students have successfully completed the OSSLT, they may not retake it.

Students who do not successfully complete the OSSLT will have additional opportunities to meet the literacy graduation requirement in accordance with the policies pertaining to the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test, the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC), or the adjudication process.

Mature students have the option to enrol directly in the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course without first attempting the OSSLT. They may still elect to meet the literacy graduation requirement by successfully completing the OSSLT.

Students whose Individual Education Plan (IEP) indicates that the student is not working towards the attainment of the OSSD may, with parental consent and the approval of the principal, be exempted from writing the OSSLT or taking the OSSL

The 40-Hour Community Involvement Requirement

Students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities as part of the diploma requirements. The purpose of this requirement is to encourage students to develop an awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role they can play and the contributions they can make in supporting and strengthening their communities. Students will plan and select their community involvement activities in consultation with their parents and as part of the Individual Pathways Plan process.

Although this diploma requirement applies to students in Grades 9 to 12, students in Grade 8 will now be able to start accumulating community involvement hours in the summer before they enter Grade 9.

For mature students, the principal will determine the number of hours of community involvement activities required.

Substitution Policy for Compulsory Credits Requirements

In order to provide the flexibility to tailor an individual student’s program to the student’s needs and to support his or her progress through secondary school, principals may substitute up to three compulsory credits with courses from other subject areas specified in the list of compulsory credit requirements (including Groups 1, 2 and 3) outlined in section 6.1.1. Substitutions should be made to promote and enhance student learning or to respond to special needs and interests.

Two half-credit courses may be used through substitution to meet one compulsory credit requirement (counted as one substitution); one full-credit course may be used through substitution to meet the two compulsory half-credit requirements of civics and career studies (also counted as one substitution).

The decision to substitute one course for another for a student should be made only if the student’s educational interests are best served by such a substitution. If a parent or an adult student (a student who is eighteen years of age or older) requests a substitution, the principal will determine whether the substitution should be made. A principal may also initiate consideration of whether a substitution should be made. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or the adult student and appropriate school staff. In all cases where the parent or the adult student disagrees with the decision of the principal, the parent or the adult student may ask the appropriate supervisory officer to review the matter.

The following are limitations on substitutions for compulsory credits:

* English as a second language and English literacy development courses may not be used to substitute for a compulsory credit. (They may be used, however, to meet the compulsory credit requirements for three English credits in accordance with section 6.1.1.)

* No more than one learning strategies course, from the guidance and career education curriculum policy document, may be used through substitution to meet a compulsory credit requirement.

* Credits earned for cooperative education courses may not be used through substitution to meet compulsory credit requirements.

* A locally developed compulsory credit (LDCC) course may not be used as a substitute for a compulsory credit; it may be used only to meet the compulsory credit requirement that it has been designed to meet (see section 7.3.1).

Each substitution will be noted on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript.

Ontario Schools K to 12 Policy and Program Requirements Manual (2016), Section 6.2

Ontario Credit Courses

The courses offered at Canadian Advanced Senior High meet the Ontario Curriculum requirements for credit courses that lead to the completion of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) of 30 credits. The course outlines include a brief description, class requirements, texts, assessment strategies, curriculum strands and weighting, achievement categories, learning skills and evaluation. Each course offers 110 hours of instruction in 4 to 6 months. A transcript will be issued to the student granting 1 credit for each course.

Outlines of the Courses of Study are available on the website: www.cahigh.ca where students can download a brief outline of each course including units of study, evaluation, and resources. The Ontario Curriculum Policy documents are available on the website: www.edu.gov.on.ca.

Secondary School Courses in the Ontario Curriculum

Secondary school courses in the Ontario curriculum are organized by discipline, grade, and course type. Course types offered in Grades 9 and 10 (academic and applied courses, open courses) differ from those offered in Grades 11 and 12 (destination-related courses, open courses).

In the current Ontario curriculum, there is a clear distinction between applied and academic courses in Grades 9 and 10, as well as among the various destination courses in Grades 11 and 12. Open courses in Grades 9 to 12 are also distinct from other course types. Depending on the subject and/or discipline, students may earn credit for the successful completion of more than one course in the same subject at any given grade level.

All schools will offer both a sufficient number of courses and courses of appropriate types to enable students to meet the diploma requirements. Schools are not expected to offer all courses in all course types but must provide a range of choices appropriate to the needs and interests of their students.

Grade 9 and 10 Courses

The following three types of courses are offered in Grades 9 and 10:

Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate.

Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and develop students’ knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study.

Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind.

In Grades 9 and 10, students will select an appropriate combination of academic, applied, and open courses in order to add to their knowledge and skills, explore their interests, and determine the type of educational program they are best suited to undertake in Grades 11 and 12. When selecting their courses in Grades 9 and 10, students are not expected to make binding decisions about a particular educational or career pathway; however, they should try to ensure that they have the prerequisites required for future courses they plan to take (see section 7.2.3).

Grade 11 and 12 Courses

The following five types of courses are offered in Grades 11 and 12:

College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for most college programs or for admission to specific apprenticeship or other training programs.

University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs.

University/college preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges.

Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers, if they plan to workforce directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs.

Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind.

In Grades 11 and 12, students will focus increasingly on their individual interests and will identify and prepare for their postsecondary pathways. In these grades, there are also increased opportunities for learning experiences beyond the school, including cooperative education, work experience, and specialized programs such as the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program, Specialist High Skills Major programs, and school-work transition programs. Students in Grades 11 and 12 have access to an appropriate destination-related course in at least English, mathematics, and science, in accordance with the course types included in the curriculum policy documents for these disciplines.

Ontario Schools: K to 12 Policy & Program Requirements, 2016, 7.2

Changing Course Types

To change a course type will require students taking a transfer course or the recommendation from the subject teacher to move from one course type to another such as applied level to the academic level. The recommendation will be reviewed by the principal who will determine if the course type change is reasonable.

According to the Ontario Schools: K to 12 Policy and Program Requirements, 2016:

7.2.4 Procedures for Students Who Wish to Change Course Types

Some students may change their educational goals as they proceed through secondary school. When they decide to embark on a new pathway, they may find that they have not completed all of the prerequisite courses they need. Schools must make provisions to allow students to make such changes of direction and must clearly describe these provisions in their school program/course calendar.

In most cases, a student may enrol in a different type of course in a given subject in Grade 10 than the type he or she completed in Grade 9, although doing so may require additional preparation, as recommended by the principal. In the case of mathematics, however, the sole prerequisite for the Grade 10 academic mathematics course is the Grade 9 academic mathematics course, so a student who is planning to move from the Grade 9 applied mathematics course to the Grade 10 academic mathematics course must take either the designated transfer course or the Grade 9 academic mathematics course.

In Grades 10 to 12, a student may change to a different type of course in a given subject provided that the student has taken any course specified as a prerequisite for that course. If the student has not done so, he or she may take one of the specified prerequisite courses through summer school, night school, e-learning, the Independent Learning Centre, or independent study.

If the principal believes that a student can be successful in a particular course without having taken the specified prerequisite course, the principal may waive the prerequisite.

Course Code

 

Course code is a standard identification established by the Ministry of Education in Ontario of credit courses taken by a student.  The course code will be used on report cards, transcripts, and any other documents that will reflect Ontario credit courses.  It is a combination of letters to identify subject area, numeric level, and academic level of difficulty.

 

For example:

ENG3U             ENG  is the subject which is English

3       is the level which is grade 11 (4th position)

U      is the type which is university (5th position)

 

4th position of the code Course Grade 5th position of the code Course Type
1 Grade 9 C College
2 Grade 10 D Academic
3 Grade 11 M Mixed (College or University)
4 Grade 12 O Open
A Level 1 P Applied
B Level 2 U University
C Level 3
D Level 4
E Level 5

 

Other credit courses in Business, Social Sciences, Science, and Technology are available on an individual’s needs basis.

 

Arts Education
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 9 Drama Open ADA1O 1 None
Grade 12 Visual Arts University/College AVI4M 1 Grade 11 Visual Arts

 

 

Business
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 9 Business Open BBI1O 1 None
Grade 10 Business Open BBI2O 1 None
Grade 11 Accounting University/College BAF3M 1 None
Grade 11 Marketing College BMI3C 1 None
Grade 12 Accounting University/College BAT4M 1 Grade 11 Accounting
Grade 12 International Business University/College BBB4M 1 Any Business studies or Canadian/ World studies

 

 

English as a Second Language (ESL)
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
ESL Level 1 Open ESLAO 1 None
ESL Level 2 Open ESLBO 1 ESL Level 1
ESL Level 3 Open ESLCO 1 ESL Level 2
ESL Level 4 Open ESLDO 1 ESL Level 3
ESL Level 5 Open ESLEO 1 ESL Level 4

 

 

English
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 9 English Academic ENG1D 1 None
Grade 10 English University ENG2D 1 ENG1D
Grade 10 Literacy Skills: Reading and Writing Open ELS2O 1 ENG1D
Grade 11 English University ENG3U 1 ENG2D
Grade 11 Presentation and Speaking Skills Open EPS3O 1 ENG2D/ENG2P
Grade 12 English University ENG4U 1 ENG3U
Grade 12 Studies in Literature University ETS4U 1 ENG3U
Grade 12 The Writer’s Craft University EWC4U 1 ENG3U
Grade 12 The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) University/College OLC4O 1 Failed OSSLT

 

 

Guidance and Career Education
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 9 Learning Strategies Open GLS1O 1 None
Grade 10 Careers Open GLC2O 0.5 None
Grade 11 Leadership Open GPP3O 1 GLC2O

 

 

Interdisciplinary Studies
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 12 University IDC4U 1 Any University/College Grade 11 Preparation course

 

 

International Languages
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 12 Mandarin University LKADU 1 LKACU

 

 

Mathematics
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 9 Math Academic MPM1D 1 None
Grade 10 Math Academic MPM2D 1 Math Grade 9
Grade 11 Functions University MCR3U 1 Math Grade 10
Grade 12 Advanced Functions University MHF4U 1 Math Grade 11
Grade 12 Calculus & Vectors University MCV4U 1 MHF4U
Grade 12 Data Management University MDM4U 1 Math Grade 11

 

 

Science
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 9 Science Academic SNC1D 1 None
Grade 10 Science Academic SNC2D 1 SNC1D
Grade 11 Biology University SBI3U 1 SNC2D
Grade 11 Physics University SPH3U 1 SNC2D
Grade 11 Chemistry University SCH3U 1 SNC2D
Grade 12 Biology University SBI4U 1 SBI3U
Grade 12 Chemistry University SCH4U 1 SCH3U
Grade 12 Physics University SPH4U 1 SPH3U
Grade 12 Earth/

Space Science

University SES4U 1 SNC2D

 

 

Social Sciences
Course Course Type Course Code Credit Value Prerequisite*
Grade 10 Civics Open CHV2O 0.5 None
Grade 9 Geography Open CGC1D 1 None
Grade 11 Geography Open CGG3O 1 Grade 9 Geography
Grade 12 Geography University CGU4M 1 Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies English or Social Sciences and humanities
Grade 12 World Issues University CGW4U 1 Any University or University/College Preparation course in English or Social Sciences
Grade 12 Economics University CIA4U 1 Any University or University/College Preparation course in English or Social Sciences
Grade 12 Individuals and Families in a Diverse Society University/College HHS4U 1 Any University or University/College Preparation course in English or Social Sciences
Grade 12 Challenge & Change in Society

 

 

University HSB4U 1 Any University or University/College

Preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities,

English, or Canadian and World Studies

 

*Prerequisites can also be met by equivalent courses in other provinces in Canada or in other countries or proficiency assessment.  Prerequisites will be assessed at the end of the student’s first school year.

Outlines of the Courses of Study

Outlines of the courses of study are posted on the Canadian Advanced Senior High website. When you click on the course code, a course profile will appear that gives the course description, the resources used, units of study, assessment tools, and evaluation weighting.

Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents

All the curriculum policy documents are available to the public by going to the Ministry of Education website: www.edu.gov.on.ca. Select “secondary” and then select “secondary curriculum”.

Withdrawal from Grade 11 and 12 Courses

Students who would like to withdraw from a grade 11 or 12 course should consult with the administration before taking action as well as discussing this option with their parents/guardians (under 18 years of age).

After consultation, a student may request withdrawing from a course in writing. However, the student must be aware of the full disclosure of all grade 11 and 12 final course marks, withdrawals, and repeats on their transcripts. If a student withdraws from a course 5 instructional days after to the mid-term mark, the course and mark will be recorded on the transcript.

From the Ontario Schools: K to 12 Policy and Program Procedures 2016:

7.5 Procedures for Students Who Fail to Meet Course Expectations

Where a student does not achieve the curriculum expectations of a course, the principal and teaching staff, in consultation with the parents and the student, will determine what type of program would best enable the student to meet the expectations and earn credit for the course. Students should be allowed to repeat only the material relating to the expectations not achieved, providing that the eligibility requirements for credit recovery are met. Alternatively, the student may repeat the entire course.

A student who fails or withdraws from a compulsory credit course should be informed of the consequences for meeting diploma requirements. The program options available to meet the requirements should be outlined, and possible alternative courses identified.

For procedures related to the recording of course attempts and withdrawals, see The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) Manual (2013)

Course Challenge by Student

If a student is concerned about the practices followed in a course, the student may submit in writing to the principal/designate with a detailed explanation. Upon receipt of this letter, the principal shall review it and meet with the student and parent if student is under 18 to respond to the concerns outlined. Every effort will be made to ensure the solution is equitable and reasonable for all parties involved.

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition Process (PLAR)

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) is the formal evaluation and credit granting process whereby students can obtain credits for prior learning. Under the direction of the principal, students can have their knowledge and skills evaluated against the expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).

The PLAR process involves two components: “challenge” and “equivalency.” The course comparison information is for use in the PLAR “equivalency” process; the process for assessing credentials from other jurisdictions.

PLAR for Regular Day School Students

For regular day school students, a maximum of 4 credits may be granted through the challenge process for grade 10 to 12 courses. Students, enrolled in Ontario secondary schools as regular day school students, who are eligible for equivalency credits are those who transfer to Ontario secondary schools from non-inspected private schools or schools outside Ontario. Equivalency credits are granted for placement only. The principal in the receiving school will, in the process of deciding where the student should be placed, determine as equitably as possible the total credit equivalency of the student’s previous learning, and the number of compulsory and optional credits still to be earned.

See Policy /Program Memorandum No.129, Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR): Implementation in Ontario Secondary Schools, 2001

PLAR Credit Equivalency for Mature Students

For mature students enrolled in Ontario secondary schools, requirements concerning the application of the PLAR “equivalency” process differ from those for regular day school students because of the broader life experience of mature students. The “equivalency” process for mature students involves individual assessment for the purpose of granting Grade 9 or 10 credits, and/or assessment and credentials and other appropriate documentation from jurisdictions outside Ontario for the purpose of granting credit for a Grade 11 or 12 course developed from an Ontario curriculum policy document published in 2000 or later. See Policy /Program Memorandum Mp.132, Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) for Mature Students: Implementation in Ontario Secondary Schools, 2003

Reporting Procedures

Report Cards

Mid-term and final reports are issued to the student for each course. A mid-term report card will be issued when students have completed 50% of the course material of a 1 credit course. The midterm report card will be released from the Guidance Office 7 business days after the course teacher has completed it. A final report card will be issued when students have completed all the requirements for a course (total 110 hours). All course assignments, tests, learning logs, discussion forums, and final exam must be completed. The final report card will be released within 14 business days after students have written their final exam.

Ontario Student Transcript

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is a provincially standardized document that provides a comprehensive record of a student’s achievement in secondary school, according to the Ontario Student Transcript Manual 2010. The credits that a student has earned towards fulfillment of the requirements for the graduation diploma will be recorded on the OST regardless how or where the credits were earned.

Student Evaluation and Examination Policies

At the beginning of each course, students will be informed about expectations, curriculum content and evaluation. Students will also be informed about the assignment requirements, tests, and the calculation of the final mark. On-going formative assessments will be conducted to improve knowledge and skills as well as summative evaluation to demonstrate achievement for each course.

Ontario Secondary School (OSS) courses will follow the curriculum expectations and achievements in the Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents.

In the Growing Success Ontario Ministry of Education Document 2010,

Categories of Knowledge and Skills

The achievement chart identifies four categories of knowledge and skills that are common to both the elementary and secondary panels and to all subject areas and disciplines. The categories, defined by clear criteria, represent four broad areas of knowledge and skills within which the expectations for any given subject/course can be organized. The four categories should be considered as interrelated, reflecting the wholeness and interconnectedness of learning. The categories help teachers to focus not only on students’ acquisition of knowledge but also on their development of the skills of thinking, communication, and application.

The categories of knowledge and skills are as follows:

* Knowledge and Understanding: Subject-specific content acquired in each grade/course (knowledge), and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding)

* Thinking: The use of critical and creative thinking skills and/or processes

* Communication: The conveying of meaning through various forms

* Application: The use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts

In all subjects and courses, students should be given numerous and varied opportunities to demonstrate the full extent of their achievement of the curriculum expectations (content standards) across all four categories of knowledge and skills. Teachers will ensure that student learning is assessed and evaluated in a balanced manner with respect to the four categories, and that achievement of particular expectations is considered within the appropriate categories. The emphasis on “balance” reflects the fact that all categories of the achievement chart are important and need to be a part of the process of instruction, learning, assessment, and evaluation in all subjects and courses. However, it also indicates that for different subjects and courses, the relative importance of each of the categories may vary. The importance accorded to each of the four categories in assessment and evaluation should reflect the emphasis accorded to them in the curriculum expectations for the subject or course, and in instructional practice.

To further guide teachers in their assessment and evaluation of student learning, the achievement chart provides “criteria” and “descriptors”. The criteria are the subsets of knowledge and skills that define each category. They identify the aspects of student performance that are assessed and/or evaluated, and serve as a guide to what teachers look for. For example, in the English curriculum in the Knowledge and Understanding category, the criteria are “knowledge of content” and “understanding of content” and include examples such as forms of text and elements of style, and relationships among facts, respectively. The descriptors indicate the characteristics of the student’s performance, with respect to the particular criterion, on which assessment or evaluation is focused. Effectiveness is the descriptor used for each of the criteria in the Thinking, Communication, and Application categories. What constitutes effectiveness in any given performance task will vary with the particular criterion being considered. Assessment of effectiveness may therefore focus on a quality such as appropriateness, clarity, accuracy, precision, logic, relevance, significance, fluency, flexibility, depth, or breadth, as appropriate for the particular criterion.

Levels of Achievement

The achievement chart also identifies four levels of achievement, defined as follows:

Level 1 represents achievement that falls much below the provincial standard. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with limited effectiveness. Students must work at significantly improving learning in specific areas, as necessary, if they are to be successful in the next grade/course

Level 2 represents achievement that approaches the provincial standard. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with some effectiveness. Students performing at this level need to work on identified learning gaps to ensure future success.

Level 3 represents the provincial standard for achievement. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with considerable effectiveness. Parents of students achieving at level 3 can be confident that their children will be prepared for work in subsequent grades/courses.

Level 4 identifies achievement that surpasses the provincial standard. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with a high degree of effectiveness. However, achievement at level 4 does not mean that the student has achieved expectations beyond those specified for the grade/course.

Specific “qualifiers” are used with the descriptors in the achievement chart to describe student performance at each of the four levels of achievement – the qualifier limited is used for level 1; some for level 2; considerable for level 3; and a high degree of or thorough for level 4. Hence, achievement at level 3 in the Thinking category for the criterion “use of planning skills” would be described in the achievement chart as “[The student] uses planning skills with considerable effectiveness”.

It is the student’s responsibility to be present for all assessments and evaluations given in each course. If the student is aware, in advance, that a test will be missed, it is again the responsibility of the student to inform the teacher including school sponsored events. Failure to communicate with the teacher in advance may result in a zero on the evaluation. If absent due to illness, a written note by parent/guardian for students under 18 years will be required and in some instances, a medical note may be asked.

At the end of each term, the student/parent will receive a report card that records student academic progress, learning skills, attendance and lates, and credit accumulation towards the OSSD. A copy of this report card will also be maintained in the Ontario Student Record (OSR) file by the school.

Learning skills include: work independently, work habits/homework, organization, initiative, and teamwork. Achievement of these 5 learning skills is reported by using the following codes: N = Needs Improvement S = Satisfactory G = Good E = Excellent

Students who wish to withdraw from a course must inform the teacher in writing by a parent/guardian for students under 18 years of age or by the student who is 18 years of age or over. The course will not be identified on the official student transcript if the course is dropped 5 days after the mid-term mark is issued. Otherwise, full disclosure will occur after 5 days and shown as withdrawn.

In all credit courses requiring examinations, the following condition apply:

• written exams will be timed and supervised

* mid-term test will be a maximum of 15% in the course work of 70%

* formal exam at the end of course will be a final evaluation mark of 30%

* student is responsible for checking the exam schedule to note when the exam will be written on a specific date and time; no extra time will be give if student is late

* student who is absent from any formal examination or final evaluation will receive a “O” unless a medical certificate is provided to the principal or designate

The exam schedule and reporting periods are recorded on the school calendar.

To ensure that assessment, evaluation, and reporting are valid and reliable, teachers use practices and procedures that are fair, transparent, and equitable for all students; support all students, including those with special education needs.

Ontario Student Record (OSR)

Each student will have an Ontario Student Record (OSR) maintained at Canadian Advanced Senior High that maintains student achievement scores, term and final report cards, the Ontario Student Transcript, and any other pertinent academic information about the student. Parents and students 18 years and over may request to view the OSR at any time.

School Support Services and Resources

All students will be provided the following:

* orientation

* academic and course selection advisory

* guidance and career counseling

* individual pathways plan

* university and college information and applications

* learning skills and work habit development

* students at risk intervention plan

* remedial support for English language learners

* e-resources

Tutorial Services

Students who require remedial support will have the opportunity to obtain additional instruction by the course teacher. If intensive support is required, students have the option of asking for a private tutor.